Virtual Reality – The Possibilities are Endless

By: Colton Schang

Most often when we think of virtual reality it involves throwing on a headset and entering into a world that has never been seen before. Worlds, creatures, colors and sounds that are new and intriguing. Or maybe experiencing something through the eyes of another, similar to the Samsung experience I had a few months ago in NYC. Although this may be the conventional way of thinking about this revolutionary technology, most applications for VR go beyond pure entertainment.

A variety of examples of VR are showing up in the medical field. A UCLA study on rats is showing how the brain is reacting to spatial cues and environments. This leading research could help to “cure neurological disorders, such as autism, epilepsy and Alzheimer’s disease, because the disorders affect the regions of the brain involved in spatial perception.”

VR used to overcome phobias and treat anxiety.

Another study involving VR as a form of therapy, is drastically helping individuals with anxiety and phobias. They are able to be in exposed to some of their phobias in a VRE (Virtual Reality Environment) and then are taught specific techniques to help them navigate through it. “VRE also permits the exposure to be well controlled and orchestrated so that anxiety is recreated incrementally in a stepwise, safe, and calibrated approach.”

Ford using VR to help facilitate the design process.

In the design world, VR has been speeding up the design process from weeks to hours. An example I came across is how Ford is experimenting with it to take design to a whole other level. VR can put the designers in the consumer’s seat to understand better the design tweaks that they are making. It also provides the designer with the driving perspective of the design that they can view through the lens of the driver on a virtual road.

Virtual reality technology is advancing rapidly, and its uses are being creatively explored more and more in design, healthcare, psychiatry and more. It’s only a matter of time before some form of VR will be common place in our ever day lives.

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This Article Has 14 Comments
  1. Isabelle Shattuck says:

    Hi Colton! I really enjoyed reading your blog post; I think virtual reality is thought of as something very advanced and people don’t always realize that it’s an actual thing. It was interesting to read that Ford is using VR to help build their vehicles to accommodate consumers needs, as well as using it to learn how to make their vehicles better. It also was very interesting to read that virtual reality technology is advancing this quickly since it is something that has always seemed so futuristic.

  2. Amador Nazarov says:

    I always enjoy reading things about VR. People do not truly realize how many uses it has in today’s world! Even 10 years ago some of these things would’ve been deemed impossible. Using it for health issues such as anxiety and phobias like you mentioned is super cool. I think that’s a great way to help some people out. Thanks for writing this up.

  3. Robert Emmett says:

    Colton,

    Before reading your post, I had no idea that VR was being used in so many different industries. I’ve recognized its value from a marketing perspective, but it’s interesting to see it being implemented within the medical field and automotive design. Clearly, organizations within a variety of industries are finding the value of using VR, and as technology continues to advance so will the capabilities of artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

  4. Madelyn Dwyer says:

    Hi, Colton. Thank you for writing about Virtual Reality. This topic has always fascinated me; it is amazing that we have the technology to enter digitalized worlds and actually feel like we are “experiencing” them. I wonder how VR will evolve in the future; the possibilities seem endless. The examples you shared on the diverse applications of VR are very intriguing. I especially thought that using VR for people suffering with anxiety/phobias is such a good idea. There seems to be so much potential within this technology and I am sure more will come as it advances.

  5. Bella Barialti says:

    Hi Colton,
    Thank you so much for writing about this topic! I do not know much regarding Virtual Reality, and I never knew about all the different benefits it had. I was aware it was beneficial for those in the design industry, but I feel as most people don’t realize how much help they are providing to those with anxiety and psychology issues. Having a mom that works with kids with special needs of all spectrums and different levels of anxiety- VR has been something that has been a hot topic in their field recently. I cannot wait to see where it takes the world and how it will help the lives of so many.

    Thanks for the read!
    Bella

  6. Ian Burleigh says:

    Colton – my first response to this post was anger on behalf of a friend who was also hoping to write about the Samsung experience in NYC. That aside, I did not realize how many different industries utilized VR. To be honest, I’ve been somewhat playing Devil’s Advocate when it comes to VR as I’m not sure how I feel about the commercial uses that would lead to groups of people sitting together in a room with headsets on, not interacting with each other whatsoever. With that said, I think the examples you brought forth in this post have eased my tension towards the technology and I’m interested to continue to see how it can be used to enhance work and life alike.

  7. Rui Sun says:

    Hi Coltion,
    This is a great post, and i really enjoy to read it. VR now is more important than before, the more we learn, the more we appreciate the benefits of VR. Is there a more exciting innovation than it? As people in the developed world become immune to digital technology, or at the very least, are taking it for granted, VR is one Of the remaining few innovations that can still inspire. VR can save organizations time and money and make work more convenient. These benefits of VR are just the tip of the iceberg. I’m excited to see where the technology will go in the future and how it will define the intelligent workplace.

  8. Nuchwara Youngcharoen says:

    Thank you Colton for the post. VR seems to be a new technology that would bring a cutting aged approach to many solution finding in every kind of industry. I have come across a news on how they incorporate VR in to education method. Stanford University uses VR as part of a biology class to create underwater virtual reality for students. This does not only create engagement in the classroom but it is a very affective way to communicate technical information such that in scientific areas. Moreover, VR can bring more engaging levels to many other technical subject, such as, architecture or engineering. It might help students or companies to visualize important elements within the design landscape. I’m sure that the progressive companies or school that improvise VR into their process can be able to deliver better solutions and create more engagement for their audiences .

  9. Elliana Meinert says:

    Hi Colton, I really enjoyed reading your blog post. I find virtual reality fascinating and was not aware that it was being utilized in the medical field. I think most people, including myself, view VR as a futuristic thing, and don’t really realize how often it is used in many different aspects of life. I loved your examples you wrote about, especially when you talked about how it could cure neurological disorders. It was great being informed about all these uses of VR, giving me a larger appreciation for it. I look forward to seeing where virtual reality takes us over the next few years and the many advancements it contributes to.

  10. Austin Banks says:

    Hi Colton, I really enjoyed your post on Virtual Reality. I found it really interesting that VR is now being used as a form of therapy and a way to deal with phobias. It seems VR is continuously growing and advancing so I am really intrigued to see how it will be put to use in the future, my only worry is if VR can fully correlate to real life.

  11. Rylee Marron says:

    Thanks for sharing Colton! VR is becoming more and more popular it seems like and it’s a fast-growing industry. Last semester, I did a research project on VR porn actually and how that whole industry is keeping up with VR. It’s really interesting. I think VR is going to become more valuable for social media and marketing.

  12. Rylee Marron says:

    Thanks for sharing Colton! VR is becoming more and more popular it seems like and it’s a fast-growing industry. Last semester, I did a research project on VR porn actually and how that whole industry is keeping up with VR. It’s really interesting. I think VR is going to become more valuable for social media and marketing. It’ll be interesting to see how we adapt to the social media world and how it’s going to be used in the future.

  13. Zhiheng Li says:

    Hi Colton,
    Thanks for sharing. VR and other types of XR technology have already mutually in entertainment fields already. After finishing your post, you enlight us to think about what else we can do with VR technology. There are a reason and possibility for us to develop VR in some way which can improve the whole society. To change the world positively.

  14. David Gugliotti says:

    Interesting stuff Colton. Great work. XR is becoming a huge thing that is just bubbling over into more mainstream functions. There is a ton of room for growth and expansion in this market and we need to just get on board for the ride!

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